When you were growing up were you repeated warned about crimes against children?

Question by : When you were growing up were you repeated warned about crimes against children?
Sometimes when I read stories about a young girl being raped I see warning signs that the attacker was not “right in the head”. I’m not blaming the victim. I understand that some kids were never told that any man serving a child alcohol is probably a pervert or it is not normal for a man to ask her girl to undress regardless of the reason etc, etc.

I grew up hearing horror stories so the first sign that a man is asking or talking about something inappropriate I would take off running (literally running away from him).

How was it in your childhood? Did you grow up street smart?.
Common Sense,

I’m somewhere in the middle. I was not one of those kids who was forbidden to leave the backyard (or garden). I was allowed a lot of freedom to roam but I was also very aware of imappropriate behaviors coming from adults (not just strangers).
Common Sense,

I’m somewhere in the middle. I was not one of those kids who was forbidden to leave the backyard (or garden). I was allowed a lot of freedom to roam but I was also very aware of imappropriate behaviors coming from adults (not just strangers).
Common Sense,

I’m somewhere in the middle. I was not one of those kids who was forbidden to leave the backyard (or garden). I was allowed a lot of freedom to roam but I was also very aware of imappropriate behaviors coming from adults (not just strangers).
@True Blue Brit,

“They were taught to be street-wise from the age of 5. I was so confident that they were safe, I encouraged them to go and help the man next door. And he molested them. And much to my horror they never told me, even though they had been encouraged to “always tell your parents”. They were so humiliated that they couldn’t face it – and still refuse to talk about it. It came out eventually and I dealt with it. My lesson: don’t think that children will tell you – they often can’t.”

When I was 5 I was not very street smart at all. I think I would have reacted the same way your sons did. I’m sorry for what happened to them.
@Common Sense.

“Update: I used to walk to kindergarten on my own. I know times have changed and parents today face child endangerment for doing many of the things that were common when I was a kid, but when parents who live in a safe town feel they need to drive their 14-year old kids to sports instead of letting them ride their bike, things are going farther than necessary.”

I think it takes a mix of educating kids and knowing when they have the ability to assess whether a situation could be harmful. Personally I was at least 9 before I was good at detecting behaviors that might put me in harm’s way but I was already hearing horror stories long before then..

Best answer:

Answer by Common Sense
No. I was appropriately warned about strangers in general, to not get into cars with people I don’t know, etc. This whole protectionist soccer mom paranoia often is out of proportion and interferes with kids growing up.

Update: I used to walk to kindergarten on my own. I know times have changed and parents today face child endangerment for doing many of the things that were common when I was a kid, but when parents who live in a safe town feel they need to drive their 14-year old kids to sports instead of letting them ride their bike, things are going farther than necessary.

~

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Parenting Solutions: Encouragement is the Seed of Success

www.parentingezine.com is an all-in-one parenting site featuring parenting guides, parenting solutions and parenting discipline tips from childcare experts. …
Video Rating: 0 / 5

I recommend these confident parenting products

Bookmark and Share
Tags : , , , , , , ,

4 thoughts on “When you were growing up were you repeated warned about crimes against children?”

  1. Yes I did. I remember my Mother telling me about how men with big vans would kidnap little girls and murder them. It used to terrify me. When I was about 9 or 10 the area of central Bristol I lived in became a red light district and it became extremely dangerous for any woman or girl regardless of age to go out very early in the morning or late at night.

  2. We were told to stay away from strangers. This was in the sixties. And if any man was to offer us sweets, we were to run.
    We were never told what the danger was, though. In fact, I am horrified to admit that when I was about 8, my friend and I would go and play at a man’s house – we were strictly forbidden to do so but he had this gorgeous enormous tricycle. Luckily he did us no harm – in fact he was very sweet.
    When my sons were young there was a spate of children disappearing. They were taught to be street-wise from the age of 5. I was so confident that they were safe, I encouraged them to go and help the man next door. And he molested them. And much to my horror they never told me, even though they had been encouraged to “always tell your parents”. They were so humiliated that they couldn’t face it – and still refuse to talk about it. It came out eventually and I dealt with it. My lesson: don’t think that children will tell you – they often can’t.
    When my daughters were small, I did the usual thing but went one step further – I told them that bad things could happen to them. And the bad things were being made to slave for housework or clean chimneys, or something equally horrible.
    By the way, the children who were stolen when my sons were small disappeared and were never seen again. They were abducted by a couple who committed suicide. A very respectable man and his wife, who fostered many children. So I never told my kids that the attacker would be a man.

    Edit: Sorry – I gave the wrong impression. They were much older when they were abused – about 12 and 10.

  3. When I was a child I was told not to go away with strangers who offered candy or money and I was told to protect my sisters, from such things seeing I was the 2nd born. I remember when I was 5 my dad taught how to wash my nether region and he also said no other person should ever touch that area and if they I should tell him or mom. And since then I was cautious any person who just got too close for comfort.

    Back then it was more centered about girls being raped, nowa days it’s more of a gender natural thing.

  4. My dad was a cop, my mother, a teacher…and still sexual abuse happened. It wasn’t at the hands of strangers. They were people that were entrusted to take care of me when I was too young to take care of myself. I was about four years old when it happened for the first time. I don’t recall being warned about stuff like that. I don’t recall being particularly protected from it after I told my my mother about it. (Many years later my mother would say that she didn’t know whether or not to believe me because I was so young. She never told my father about it.) So from the age of 4 to about 10, my sister and I were abused by two different care-givers. I was very nearly raped by one of them. His wife came home unexpectedly and interrupted it. I was nine years old.

    One more thing I recall is at about age 10 I reported to my father that a man had been following me home from school every day. He stopped his truck one afternoon and opened the passenger’s side door and asked if I wanted a ride. He was naked from the waist down. My dad took me down to the police station and I gave them the license plate number I had memorized. It turned out that his truck and matching plate I identified from a book of vehicles, and the man from a mug shot book. I ended up testifying against him in court. There were a number of kids there…I was the oldest and the only one allowed to testify.

    I don’t know the outcome of that case. I can only hope that justice was served because undoubtedly he was a predatory type.

    I would like to think that I’m “street smart” now. Maybe more so than the average person. Some folks think I’m too distrusting of others…but when you experience such things firsthand, it changes the way you view the world.

Leave a Reply